Displaying posts tagged: cultural heritage

The Leading Question

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Historic England has commenced a series of what it calls online debates ‘where conservation and heritage experts debate the topics uppermost in their minds’, beginning with: ‘Why is a diverse and inclusive workplace essential for the heritage sector?’

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Cultural Transmission

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This week I learnt that my work has been plagiarised in a heritage/UNESCO-themed document apparently issued to school pupils by the Nanking Model United Nations. Setting a great example there...

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Cultural Riches

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I’ve long thought it curious that returning art confiscated by the Nazi regime gets treated under the heading of restitution of cultural heritage, given that it deals with personal property, seldom with what belongs to Jewish culture or German culture or whatever culture. I’m reminded of that by an article seeking to argue that we should …

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Appropriation Expropriated

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In theory, having a topic linked to my research background hit the limelight should be a Good Thing and a source of Career Opportunities. In practice, what I find is at best that cultural appropriation sold out when it went mainstream.

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Lost and Fund

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Did you know DCMS is running an open consultation on its proposed Cultural Protection Fund? Gov.uk’s consultation search doesn’t.

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Loot

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Heritage gets everywhere. The story of Pillars of Eternity begins when trespass near an ancient and sanctified site arouses a violent reaction from the local population, who have appointed themselves the ruins’ guardians in place of their long-vanished builders; and now the game’s had me wondering what to do about an artefact taken from such ruins, …

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White Sky Thinking

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An article (login possibly required) has been doing the rounds that tries to anticipate the significance of an altered sky:

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Space Storage Space

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The BBC recently ran a short article on the ethics of leaving stuff on the Moon. It draws mainly on environmental ethics and space law; not much on space heritage, although it does note the historical value of the remnants at the Apollo landing sites.

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Spending Motivation

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Here’s a piece of guesswork about moral psychology. Suppose you are aware that purchasing antiquities without a clear provenance might result in money going to organisations like Hamas and ISIS/Islamic State. Suppose you've seen remarks like this one from Conflict Antiquities:

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Fool’s Gold

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What the Hunterian Art Gallery presents: ‘This major new exhibition features a spectacular array of Scottish gold items from the Bronze Age to the present.’

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Forebears for Sale

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‘Who owns the past?’ (or some variation) is a common question in debates and disputes involving heritage. Here’s a similar question from the world of intellectual property law: ‘Who owns a family’s history?’

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A Departing Department?

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Another rumour that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport may close? Or at least, lose responsibility for media policy, leaving it perhaps fatally weakened. When the Culture Secretary was appointed, despite having no evident suitability for the job, there were rumours (which reached the pages of Private Eye, if memory serves) that her secret mission …

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Refrozen Music

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I’m currently reading Appropriating the Past, the second essay collection linked to the Centre for the Ethics of Cultural Heritage. One of the essays, by Cornelius Holtorf (who’ll be one of the editors of the third collection), talks about cases like

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E Pluribus... Ummm...

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Even to a Briton, it can sound like something one might find in the Dictionary of Imaginary Places:

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The Modern Namesake of a Legendary King and the Ancient Remains at Stonehenge

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You can learn surprising things at academic conferences, and at one of them some comments on Stonehenge gained a contribution from a delegate in the audience who had had experience of negotiating with druids. Also, if memory serves, with other druids who were disinclined to talk to the first lot of druids. This is doubtless not …

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